Docker Compose

While I was working for Trading Technologies, we always planned on using Linux Containers to provide secure hosting of user-written TT SDK algos. Docker was supposed to be the way of ensuring proper isolation, resource management, as well as means of convenient deployment of client strategies. The infrastructure was in place, but I left before we had a chance to materialize our plans.

Recently I decided to give Docker another go, this time as a way of managing my various cloud projects. I was happy with DigitalOcean’s offering, so I began migrating my websites and jobs to their cloud. Everything, of course, is containerized and managed together. I am using Ubuntu 14.04 with Docker Compose.

I must say I am pleased with the results. The migration has been rather painless, and I like how simple the config ended up. I am running a container with a shared MariaDB (MySQL) database, a reverse-proxy Nginx to manage routing, several WordPress blog containers, few C# ASP.NET sites (Mono, not CoreCLR), some Python sites (Flask), and bunch of Python/C++ apps. A sample docker-compose.yml file is shown below.

As you can see, I am using dmp1ce/nginx-proxy-letsencrypt image as a web proxy. Just like with jwilder/nginx-proxy, it’s dead simple to configure routes. All a container needs to do is to specify VIRTUAL_HOST=something.com variable, and the web traffic will be forwarded to its exposed port. Image dmp1ce/nginx-proxy-letsencrypt has LetsEncrypt.org support built right in. Specify LETSENCRYPT_HOST and LETSENCRYPT_EMAIL and voilà- free SSL for your site 🙂

Solution to MacBook storage problems

At Trading Technologies we recently switched to laptop-centric culture. Our desktops got lugged away and everyone can choose what kind of laptop they would like to have. I was one of the pilot MacBook Pro users and I got mine over 18 months ago. It took me a while to get used to it, but it completely changed the way I work. It’s so easy to just grab a laptop and crash a meeting room with two other devs. This makes communication so much easier. Not to mention I can now work on the train. Every company should consider this!

Unfortunately my Mac came with only 256 gigs of storage. For a developer that’s not that much. Especially that I use a lot of OSs on many VMs. I asked our IT, and they listened. It came earlier today. LaCie external SSD with USB 3.0 and Thunderbolt. It’s a speedy ~250MB/sec.

 

I really had a lot of fun velcroing it to my Mac. What do you think? Geeky enough for you? 😉

Behold:

External SSD

External SSD velcroed to my MacBook Pro. Match made in heaven 😉

HID Card and Android phone

At my workplace we use HID ProxCard II cards to enter the building and to open individual doors. Everybody has a card with their picture printed on it. The problem is that I keep forgetting mine, plus I’ve had it for such a long time that the card started to disintegrate and it looks rather nasty.

HID card

I really wanted to just use my Android phone in lieu of the card, but it seems like HID cards are not compatible with NFC 🙁
This of course wasn’t going to stop me. Somehow I wanted to “fuse” the card with my phone. If my phone had a plastic case or cover, I could just slip the card inside of it. But I own an HTC Once and since it’s made out of aluminium and gorilla glass, I don’t really need (or want) a cover for it. I decided to use a sticker to attach the card instead. I ordered a custom-fit sticker from SkinIt with a cute picture of my boys on it. Now I could finally start my project 🙂

Costom skin for HTC One

 

First I cut off a small strip of plastic along every edge of the card, starting with the top. Then I removed the front layer with the printed picture. It was clear that there were two additional layers to the card. Finally, I carefully separated the two remaining layers, exposing a copper coil and something that looked like a microchip.

Removed sticker and cut sides

Coil

 

Next step was to affix the layer with coil to the back of my HTC One. I chose not to remove the coil from the plastic it was glued to, and instead to attach the whole thing to the back of the phone with scotch tape. Of course I rounded it off a little bit witch scissors, just to make it look better.

HTC One

Coil from HID card affixed to back of HTC One

The final step was to place the SkinIt sticker over the back of the phone. Sadly that didn’t go as smooth as I hoped. Since the coil and microchip are not perfectly flat, you can see a small bulge. It will take some time to get used to it, but ultimately it should not be a big deal. A small price to pay for the convinience.
Here is a photo of the finished product. Now I just need to remember to carry my phone around with me at all times at work 😀

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